Walk

Islington Cinema Walk on 22 November 2015

In Search of Islington’s Lost Cinemas

– an illuminating journey into local cinema history

Artist Walk 22 November
Antiuniversity Now! festival

22 November 2015: 10.30am – 12.30pm

Approx 2 hours (timings may vary)

Islington has a rich cinematic history as the former home of more than 40 movie theatres since cinema’s invention as well as being the birth place of one of the pioneers of British cinema R. W. Paul.

Join artist Sam Nightingale as he leads a Sunday morning walk around Angel, Essex Road and Upper Street in search of Islington’s Lost Cinemas. The walk is an opportunity to learn both about Islington’s rich cinematic past and the chance to discover the layers of history that are often hidden within the architecture of the urban everyday. In the walk we will see cinemas that are still standing, even if no longer used, picture-palaces that have left only ghostly traces of their former glory and structures that need our imagination to project the past into the present.

Details about the meeting point will be communicated once booked.

Limited to 15 places.

Book!

This walk is offered as part of Antiuniversity Now! festival.

About the artist:

Sam Nightingale is an Islington-based artist who works with photography and the moving image; he exhibits internationally, and his work has been included in exhibitions and film festivals in America, Australia and Europe.

His practice is research driven and responds to site to explore and enliven the spectral spaces of cinema, both real and imagined in locations across Europe, Australia and America. Recent work includes: ‘The Cinemas Project’ (Australia), a large-scale project that maps the spectral spaces of cinema in rural locations across the state of Victoria; ‘Islington’s Lost Cinemas’ (UK), an ongoing photographic research project that traces the history of cinema in the Borough of Islington; and ‘Parallax Shifts: In Search of Imagined Landscapes’ (USA), part of an Artist-in-Residence programme where Nightingale went in search of the imagined landscapes of the ‘Spaghetti Western’ in the deserts of the American South West.

www.samnightingale.com

 

Highbury-Picture-Theatre_blue

Exhibition Launch: London’s Lost Cinemas

LONDON’S LOST CINEMAS

@ UCL Cities Methodologies 2014

Dr Chris O’Rourke & Sam Nightingale

29 – 31 October 2014
Exhibition Launch: 28 October 18.30 – 21.00
Opening Times: 29 – 31 10.00 – 20.00

UCL Cities Methodologies 2014
5th Floor, Slade Research Centre
Woburn Square, London WC1H 0AM

London’s Lost Cinemas brings together an interactive map showing London’s lost or forgotten cinemas and photographs of the spaces that they once occupied. Between 1906 and 1930, nearly one thousand cinemas opened in and around London. These ranged from converted shops and amusement arcades to lavish ‘picture palaces’. The exhibit showcases new research and creative responses to this early period of cinema history. It invites visitors to imagine the impact that cinemas have had on London’s streets and its people, and to consider how the relationship between moving images and the city has changed over time.

Sam Nightingale’s work focuses on the London Borough of Islington where he has photographed the many locations where cinemas once stood. The images articulate the latent (or spectral) presence of this history through photographing what remains: depicting urban spaces that are at once both in the present and out of time.

Interactive map presentation times:
Wednesday: 11:00-13:00, 17:00-18:00
Thursday: 12:00-14:00-17:30-18:30
Friday: 13:00-Close

Bio
Dr. Chris O’Rourke is a Research Associate in film studies funded by the UCL Centre for Humanities Interdisciplinary Research Projects (CHIRP). His research looks at the early history of cinemas and cinema-going in London. He also teaches on UCL’s MA in Film Studies and MSc in Urban Studies.
Twitter: @ChrisORourke1 / www.ucl.ac.uk/chirp/research/projects/filmland

Sam Nightingale is a London-based artist who works with photography and the moving image. Nightingale’s practice is concerned with enlivening and imploding the hidden spaces within and between built structures.He works in a research-based and site related way to reveal the multiple histories of cinematic spaces both real and imagined.
www.samnightingale.com / www.islingtonslostcinemas.com

Cities Methodologies is an annual exhibition and programme of events showcasing innovative urban research methodologies. Through peer-reviewed exhibits and events, it draws together undergraduate, masters, and doctoral research, alongside work produced by academics and other researchers and practitioners.

UCL Cities Methodologies 2014
UCL Urban Laboratory
5th Floor, Slade Research Centre
Woburn Square
London WC1H 0AM

Map of venue

Astoria Finsbury park

In Search of Seven Sisters’ Lost Cinemas

An illuminating journey into Seven Sisters cinema history.

In conjunction with Rowan Arts – Seven Sisters Stories
13 August 2014: 6.30pm-8pm
Approx 1.5hrs (timings may vary). All on pavements.

Join artist Sam Nightingale as he takes a stroll along Seven Sisters Road in search of some of ‘Islington’s Lost Cinemas’.

The walk will explore the history of the various cinemas that have exsisted in and around Seven Sisters. The walk is an opportunity to learn about Islington’s rich cinematic past and the chance to discover the layers of history that are often hidden within the architecture of the city. We will see former ‘picture-palaces’ that are still standing and ‘penny-gaffs’ that leave only their ghostly traces behind.

Limited to 15 places. Details about the meeting point will be communicated once booked. BOOKED UP

 

photo from cinema walks

More cinema walks – past, present and future

Throughout the year Sam Nightingale conducts a number of artist-led cinema walks around the historic sites of Islington’s former cinemas and picture palaces. 

The walks are a great opportunity to learn both about the history of the countless cinemas that dotted Islington’s streets but also to look beyond the contemporary cityscape to discover the rich history that can be found below its surface.

In snowy February a brave crowd of cinema sleuths joined Sam Nightingale to walk the length of Holloway Road in search of the spectral traces of the road’s cinematic past. Sam will once again be conducting this artist-led cinema walk on Saturday 8th of June 2013.

In Search of Holloway’s Lost Cinemas
– an illuminating journey into local cinema history

Holloway Arts Festival: Artist-led cinema walk
8 June 2013: 5.30pm – 7.30pm
BOOKED-UP

But if you are interested in participating in the walk please join the waiting listhttp://hollowayslostcinemas8june.eventbrite.com

These walks are extremely popular and tend to book-up very quickly but if you would like to join the mailing list to be notified about the next walk, you can do so here.

Born-and-Bread_Rowan Arts

Book: Born and Bread – Stories of Holloway Road

Some of the stories and histories that are included in the Islington’s Lost Cinemas archive have been contributed to a new book called Born and Bread – Stories of Holloway Road.

The book is part of an oral history project that focuses on the cultural heritage of Holloway Road in Islington and has been initiated by the arts charity Rowan Arts and is supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund.

The Born and Bread project website can be found here.

Photo credit: Dylan Collard.

 

Walk

In Search of Islington’s Lost Cinemas – guided walks

Artist-led walk: In Search of Islington’s Lost Cinemas
- An illuminating journey into local cinema history,
offered as part of Islington Exhibits festival.

Dates for  walk are:
17th July (6.30-8pm)
24th July (6.30-8pm)
Please note this is the same walk, but taking place on two different dates.

Approx 1.5hrs (timings may vary)
All on pavements, flat terrain.

To coincide with the recent launch of the online archive: www.islingtonslostcinemas.com, a cultural heritage website that sets to chart and celebrate the history of cinemas in Islington, artist Sam Nightingale will lead a walk around Angel, Essex Road and Upper Street in search of Islington’s Lost Cinemas.

This walk is an opportunity to learn both about Islington’s rich cinematic past and the chance to discover the layers of history that are often hidden within the architecture of the urban everyday. In the walk we will see cinemas that are still standing, even if no longer used, picture-palaces that have left only spectral traces of their former glory and structures that need our imagination to project the past into the present.

Free: Each walk is limited to a maximum of 15 places.
Please book asap – these walks are very popular

Book Tickets

Participants will be notified of the starting point of the walk once their booking has been confirmed by email.
Note: All participation is at walker’s own risk.

Spectres of Film Installation Shot

Spectres of Film: Islington’s Lost Cinemas and other Spectral Spaces Spaces

You can see a small selection of the images from Islington’s Lost Cinemas at A Brooks art from until the 30 June 2012.

A. Brooks Art, London will host a solo exhibition by London-based artist Sam Nightingale from the 3rd May – 30 June 2012. Spectres of Film: Islington’s Lost Cinemas and other Spectral Spaces Spaces is part of an ongoing series of projects that span geographical extremes (from London to Australia) and moving image history (from pre-cinematic devices to Internet auction sites) in order to visualise film’s abandonment.

Village Twin_Morewell

Cinemas in Australia

I am currently working on a research project tracking down the sites of historic cinemas in regional Victoria. It’s a rewarding project, which have so far lead me to unearthed more than 370 spaces that have been used to show film at one time or another since the early 1900s. Somewhat like Islington’s Lost Cinemas, many of the old cinemas, public halls or Mechanics Institutes that have brought people together to watch moving images have long gone.
Yet both in Islington and the regional towns in Victoria that we are visiting traces of the buildings still exist; be this in the bricks that still stand, in the remembrance of local people or through their imagined projection onto the contemporary spaces of the everyday, such as my aim when photographically documenting the sites as they stand today.

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